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17 Sustainable and Eco Friendly Bedding Brands

17 Sustainable and Eco Friendly Bedding Brands

Homewares

Last Updated on September 25, 2020

If you follow me on Instagram and follow along regularly, you might know of the great sheet demise. 

It was a bright sunny day. I went out to grab some dinner with my sweet husband and whence I returned I noticed one very, very adorable doggie had managed to slash my favorite linen sheets. 

She felt no regret. She felt no remorse.

So I decided it was time to look into eco-friendly and sustainable bedding options. The silver lining out of all of this is that I get to share all of my discoveries with you! Hopefully, the next time you need new sheets this guide will make it a little easier. 

If you’re also in the market for a new mattress, mine is from the Futon Shop and I cannot recommend highly enough!! I LOVE them as a company and the product is brilliant. Read more about the organic and zero waste mattress I have. 

Sustainable Bedding

Here are a few of the certifications you’ll see popping up down below and what they mean: 

CERTIFIED B CORP:

A Certified B Corporation is a company that has passed B Lab’s certification process. There are five significant conditions to a Certified B Corporation which are:

  • Accountability: Directors are mandated to consider the company’s impact on all shareholders
  • Transparency: Certified B Corporations must publish and make public a report of their social and environmental performance; this report is assessed by a neutral, third-party standard.
  • Performance: Corporations much attain a minimum score on the B Impact Assessment test & re-certify every two years
  • Availability: Any business can become a Certified B Corporation, no matter what type of business entity it is or in which country/state it is incorporated
  • Cost: Certification fees vary, based on revenues

GOTS CERTIFIED:

The Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) is the world’s leading textile processing standard for organic fibers, including ecological and social criteria, backed by independent certification of the entire textile supply chain.

The aim of the standard is to define globally recognized requirements that ensure the organic status of textiles, from harvesting of the raw materials through environmentally and socially responsible manufacturing all the way to labeling in order to provide credible assurance to the end consumer.

Textile processors and manufacturers should be able to export their organic fabrics and garments with one certification accepted in all major markets.

OEKO-TEX® STANDARD 100:

The STANDARD 100 by OEKO-TEX® is a worldwide consistent, independent testing and certification system for raw, semi-finished, and finished textile products at all processing levels, as well as accessory materials used.

Examples of articles that can be certified: raw and dyed/finished yarns, woven and knitted fabrics, accessories, such as buttons, zip fasteners, sewing threads or labels, ready-made articles of various types (garments of all types, domestic and household textiles, bed linen, terry products and much more). 

GREEN BUSINESS CERTIFICATION:

Green America certifies businesses that are committed to using business as a platform for social change.

Since 1982, Green America has evaluated over 8,000 small businesses. Green businesses adopt principles, policies and practices that improve the quality of life for their customers, employees, communities, and the planet.

The members of the Green Business Network are changing the way America does business.

Some of the items linked are affiliate links which means you choose I make a slight commission for referring you for more information please see my disclosure policy

grund:

Grund is the brand that I went with! I got a basic queen set in white. Grund sells bath mats, towels, rugs and blankets. 

After sleeping on linen for a while I really wanted to give classic sheets a try, but with out all of the nasty pesticides that go into growing conventional cotton.

It’s a family run operation and they control the entire production process down to the yarn.

The cotton they use is 100% GOTS certified organic, and Grund has gone the extra mile to be OEKO-TEX Standards & Green Business Certified. 

They are made from 100% Organic material, zero use of bleach, formaldehyde or any other toxic substances or dyes, and the sheets were shipped without any plastic which was awesome! 

I’ve slept on them for a couple of months now and I really like them. They remind me a lot of hotel sheets. They’re cool and crisp. I’ve also been really impressed with the quality, I highly recommend. 

american blossom linens:

I’ve spent a few weeks sleeping in a set of organic sheets from American Blossom Linens and I just had to share them!

Thomaston Mills the company that manufactures American Blossom Linens has been in business since 1899.

In the 1800’s one of the most valuable things a family owned was their linens. If a fire broke out, they would strip their beds and throw their sheets out the window to try and save them.

These sheets are very thick, very high quality, and it wouldn’t surprise me if they lasted 50+ years.

The sheets are made in Georgia using 100% USA Organic Cotton grown by family farmers in West Texas.

They’re environmentally responsible, traceable and will only get softer after each wash. I have a set of the Classic

American Made Organic Cotton Sheets. These sheets are not bleached so they’re not a true white, but a really pretty natural white which I prefer.

As a bonus, their queen and king bed sets come with a two sets of pillowcases which is amazing because I always sleep with two pillows!

The sheets came in a box without any plastic packaging, and they’re offering all GZW readers 15% off with the code ZEROWASTE15!

made trade:

Made Trade is unique in that they offer a variety of different pieces from different artisans and makers all over the world. They have an amazing selection of really cute bedding, blankets, and throw pillows.

I’m thinking about snagging a few of these knit pillows for my office.

Made Trade’s mission is to make shopping easy because they do all of the homework for you!

They figure out the answers to questions like, “Where was it made? How was it made? Was the maker paid a living wage? Were the materials sourced responsibly?”

From their website, “We call it being “ethically elevated.” It means we put artistry above efficiency.

Fair wages above profits. Sustainability above mass production. Quality craftsmanship above mindless consumption.

And transparency above everything, as we painstakingly hand-select only the most artfully-designed, ethically-made goods that put people and our planet first.” Read more here

If an item can answer all of those questions positively, then it makes it into the shop so you can feel good about the pieces that you’re buying.

biome:

The last sheet set I had was from Biome. It was my first time sleeping on linen sheets and I really loved it. I was drawn to linen for a couple of reasons.

Linen is a very sustainable fabric and it’s naturally hypoallergenic and antibacterial.

Since I deal with acne I really wanted to find a bedding that would aid in my skin care routine and it did.  

Linen is breathable and enhances comfort by keeping you cool in summer and warm in winter. 

Biome is a zero waste, plastic free store that does the homework for you. Biome is a certified B Corporation. Any of the brands in the shop have to meet a strict criteria to be sold: 

  • Honesty in labelling.
  • Meets our strict standards.
  • Zero harm to people or animals.
  • Brands with passion and ethics.
  • Good from the maker to the end.
  • Performs better than unsafe alternatives.

They have organic cotton sheets, linen, and hemp. 

holy lamb organics:

When ever I’m in the market for a new comforter, Holy Lamb Organics will be my first stop. They are a completely zero waste company. No waste – ever! 

I’m very impressed to their zero waste commitment and no plastic packaging policy.  Their company is rooted in permaculture philosophy and sustainability. 

They make mattresses, comforters, sheets, pillows, etc. My friend has one of their comforters and absolutely loves it. 

Their sheets are outsourced and made by another company, but their comforters are made in the U.S. by them. 

Holy Lamb Organics is 100% GOTS certified organic, OEKO-TEX Standards, and Green Business Certified among several others. 

coyuchi:

Coyuchi has you covered on a number of fronts from towels, duvets, shower curtains, table cloths, even bath robes! 

Something I find to be really intriguing is their rental option. You can rent sheets and towels for certain periods of time and then send them back to the company where they will take responsibility for recycling, upcycling, or renewing them, and then sending them on to a new life.

This whole process very much mimics corporate responsibility in a circular economy. Read this blog post for more information on what is a circular economy. 

Coyuchi is committed to minimally processed fibers and adhere to strict manufacturing processes such as GOTS and Fair Trade USA standards.

anchal: 

I fell in love with Anchal after writing my Eco-Friendly Dorm Room post. I picked out one of their throws or quilts for every profile in the post. 

I fell in love so much that I had to get one for my own bed. In orange… of course! They’re soft, cozy, and I love the colors! This is from their collection made from vintage saris. 

Anchal is a non-profit 501c(3) social enterprise that addresses the exploitation of women around the world. Through their artisan program, Anchal provides alternative careers in textile design and production to exploited and marginalized women in India.

Anchal works directly with female commercial sex workers who are seeking a way out of the trade.

They have organic cotton quilts as well as their upcycled sari quilts. 

sol organics:

After publishing this blog post, SOL Organics reached out to me see if I’d be interested in trying their sheets. I got the Percale Organic sheets in dove gray and I really like the texture of these sheets.

They’re not silky smooth. They feel a little more raw which I really like. I’d compare it to a linen cotton hybrid kind of feel. They have that texture so I feel like I sleep in place instead of sliding around on super satiny sheets. Does that make sense?

The sheets are a little thin, so if you’re looking for heavy duty winter sheets, these might not be the ones for you. But, they are perfect for spring, summer and early fall!

As we’re starting to dip into the low 40s at night, they definitely maintain heat, but I needed to add a heavier blanket on top of these sheets and the Anchal quilt which is also thin.

If you’re looking for more year round sheets or sheets for winter check out the sateen sets!

The company is certified Fair Trade, Organic Cotton, and GOTS certified, and they ship completely plastic free! They’re shipped in a self-bag made from 100% organic cotton which can be composted, but I’m using it to buy lettuce from the farmers market!

Then they’re wrapped with 100% recycled paper and put inside a recycled brown shipping box. No plastic whatsoever!

And, as a huge bonus they’re offering all GZW readers 20% off with the code ‘GZW20’ just apply it at checkout.

 

 
 
 
 
 
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other: 

I wanted to mention a few other places to pick up sustainable linens. Similar to my sustainable undies post, I talked in depth about the brands that I had personal experience with either first hand or through a good friend. 

But, I also want to mention several other brands I’ve heard of in case you’d like to do some more research. Let me know in the comments section if there’s a brand you love that I’ve missed! 

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  1. Pottery Barn and Pottery Barn Kids seem to have a lot of organic linens at competitive prices, with the advantage that they have brick and mortar stores in many places where people can see the colors etc. in person. What do you think of them?

    Also, any thoughts on carbon footprint for these items? My problem with a lot of organic linens is that they’re produced in India, which is about as far from the US as one can get, so I wonder whether the overall impact on the environment might actually be less from a local brand (though many non-organic sheets also seem to be produced abroad as well). Do you know of folks who produce linens with local organic fabrics? I’ve found that for some clothes (Pansy), but not linens.

    Thanks!

  2. I’m not 100% sure of when you wrote this post, but I know that in 2019 IKEA has fully sustainable linens, using sustainable cotton and lyocel (a wood fibre product, also sustainable)… Just an added FYI ?

  3. Alterra Pure is getting a lot of attention owing to their incredible percale and a zeal for organic integrity and transparency. Seems many use transparency as a buzzword, but Alterra shares every detail and ingredient – they seem to have no secrets.

  4. Your article is very informative and I appreciate the effort you went through to assemble it. I am wondering if you have done any comparison with less expensive sheets that are still high quality and long lasting, but with less of an investment required?

  5. I do not see how American Blossom Linens can be sustainable. Cotton is an incredibly water intensive crop and West Texas agriculture is dependent on water from the Ogallala aquifer which is a fossil (little to no water recharge) aquifer. Growing cotton in West Texas is very wasteful and risks much of the region losing their water supply.

  6. Thanks for your research on organic and sustainable sheets!! Have you done any research on pillows yet? My husband recently started a natural and sustainable pillow company. 😊 He is hoping to get many of the certifications that you mentioned above, buy they all take time to get. Check it out if you are looking for a fully adjustable pillow as well. https://www.wakewelltoday.com/